Julie Gross Realty Group - Norwood Real Estate - Lamacchia Realty, Inc.



61 Churchill Dr, Norwood, MA 02062

Single-Family

$850,000
Price

12
Rooms
5
Beds
3/1
Full/Half Baths
Welcome home to this fabulous colonial located in desirable High School area! Upon entering, you will find the dining room with recessed lighting & a custom built in wine cooler. This opens into the beautiful kitchen complete w/breakfast bar, s/s appliances & granite countertops. Next, enter your sun-lit living room offering a cozy fireplace, beautiful custom-built cabinetry, and a large home office/study off this space. Relax and unwind in your illuminated heated sunroom with sliding doors leading to the back deck and yard. Upstairs, you will find a spacious master bedroom w/master bathroom & walkin closet, along with 3 additional bedrooms and full bathroom. BONUS FEATURE! There is an accessory in-law apartment w/living room, dine-in kitchen, bathroom & bedroom! Hardwood floors mostly throughout. Central Air. Partially finished basement. About 5 minutes to Norwood center, there is SO much to do nearby! Get your offers in; this won't stay on the market for long. Showings begin Sunday.
Open House
Sunday
March 21 at 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM
Schedule appt through Showing Time. Times MAY overlap. Covid precautions will be taken. Approx 10-12 ppl will be allowed in at once. Lines may still form.
Cannot make the Open Houses?
Location: 61 Churchill Dr, Norwood, MA 02062    Get Directions

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This Condo in Norwood, MA recently sold for $617,150. This Townhouse style home was sold by Julie Gross - Lamacchia Realty, Inc..


253 Nahatan, Norwood, MA 02062

Condo

$619,900
Price
$617,150
Sale Price

5
Rooms
2
Beds
2/1
Full/Half Baths
Welcome to Nahatan Hill! 80% SOLD OUT! THIS UNIT IS MOVE IN READY! Beautifully designed, new construction unit built by well regarded builder. High end finishes throughout. Townhouse boasts open concept first floor with chef's kitchen including Schrock cabinetry, stainless steel appliances, granite counter tops and gas fireplace in living area. Unit features hardwood floors throughout, nice sized main bedroom suite with attached bath, in unit laundry and 2 car garage. Lots of storage/work space in the garage. Private yard off back deck. Close to town center and "T". All photos are sample photos of previously finished units by developer. READY FOR OCCUPANCY!! **ACTIVE SITE, DO NOT WALK WITHOUT LIST AGENT**

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Photo by Mark McCammon via Pexels

Anyone who has ever gone out on a job interview or a date knows how important a good first impression is. First impressions can color the entire way we approach a person and environment. When it comes to your home, you want to create a positive setting that draws people in on first sighting.

But did you know that there are several common home staging mistakes that sellers do that actually have an opposite, polarizing effect; turning away potential buyers?  The following is a look at those common faux pas to ensure you avoid them and instead sell your home fast:

3 Common Home Staging Mistakes to Avoid

Not professionally cleaning before the stage. Regular house cleaning, even if it's the best house cleaning efforts you've ever done, may not be enough to really appeal during home staging. This is one of those situations in which you want a deep clean done by the professionals. Professional house cleaning services will ensure everything is pristine from floorboard to ceiling corner, helping both get out stains and lingering odors. This is important both because a deep clean best shows off a property and it sends a subliminal message that the house has been well-cared for and maintained.

Forgetting about storage areas (including the garage). Storage areas can be make or break spaces for your future buyers. So it's important to not neglect these areas when prepping for photographs or open houses. If necessary, consider renting a storage facility to store all of your excess clothes, blankets, Tupperware, etc. Thus, whether it's a closet or garage, make sure it's included in your list of places to prep!

Not putting away personal items. This can be a very, very hard thing for home sellers to avoid but it is important. Remember, the goal of a home staging, both in pictures and when setting up an open house, is to get potential home buyers to imagine what the home could be like if it were theirs. You want to create a neutral canvas that allows your audience to paint in the details. As such, having too many personal items and personalized decor touches can turn off potential home buyers. So pack them up and send them off to the storage unit before the cameras come out and the buyers start a'knocking. 


Anyone can buy a home – all it takes is hard work and diligence to evaluate your home financing options. Fortunately, we're here to help you streamline the process of finding the financing that you'll need to pay for a residence.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you determine how you will afford a house.

1. Take a Look at Your Current Financial Situation

Put together a monthly budget that outlines your current spending patterns. This will enable you to review how much you earn, what you're paying for housing and other pertinent financial information.

After an in-depth review of your current financial situation, you'll be better equipped than ever before to determine how much you can pay for a house. Then, you can create a homebuying budget to help you move closer to acquiring your dream residence.

2. Get a Copy of Your Credit Report

In all likelihood, a lender will receive your credit score to determine whether you are a viable candidate for a mortgage. If you request a copy of your credit report today, you can learn about your credit score and take steps to improve it before you apply for a mortgage.

The three major credit reporting bureaus (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion) provide one free copy of a credit report annually. If you submit a request for your credit report, you can gain unprecedented credit insights in no time at all.

Furthermore, if you find errors on a credit report, don't hesitate to contact the reporting bureau. This will enable you to fix any credit report mistakes prior to applying for a mortgage.

3. Reach Out to Local Lenders

Banks and credit unions are happy to meet with you and discuss a variety of mortgage options. These lenders are available in cities and towns nationwide and can teach you everything you need to know about home financing.

Ultimately, lenders can explain the home financing process and ensure you can avoid any potential pitfalls along the way. And if you ever have mortgage concerns or questions, lenders are available to respond to them at any time.

If you need extra help prior to kicking off a home search, you may want to contact a real estate agent as well. This housing market professional understands the ins and outs of purchasing a house and can help you plan accordingly.

Oftentimes, a real estate agent will meet with you and learn about your homebuying goals. This housing market professional then can ensure you won't have to break your budget to afford a terrific residence.

If you want to buy a home but have limited finances at your disposal, a real estate agent is happy to assist you. Or, if you are searching for a mortgage but don't know where to begin, a real estate agent can put you in touch with top lenders.

Work with a real estate agent, and you can improve your chances of acquiring a first-rate house at an affordable price.


Photo by Lukas from Pexels

Before you even start looking for a home, you should know what your credit score is. You can pull your own credit score from the three major bureaus without having points deducted from your credit score. You should know your score since it will affect how high your mortgage payments will be, and it will also determine if a lender will lend to you. Certain types of loans have a minimum credit score — if your credit is below the minimum, you won’t be able to qualify for that type of loan.

Credit Score Minimums

Many programs require you to have a minimum credit score. Most lenders will require these scores for these types of loans:

620 for a conventional loan;

580 for an FHA loan if you want your down payment to be as low as 3.5 percent;

500 to 579 for an FHA loan with a down payment of 10 percent;

620 for a VA loan;

640 for a USDA loan; and

720 or higher for a jumbo loan.

Credit Scores and Interest Rates

The lower your interest rate is, the less you have to pay to the lender for allowing you to borrow money. This also means a lower monthly payment for you. Even a half-point could make a large difference in how much you have to repay. While a half-point might equal $50 or $60 per month on your loan, when you pay that over 360 months, that is $18,000 to $21,600 over the life of the loan.

Creditors use your credit score to see how careful you are with credit – how you will pay it back, and if you will pay it back. The higher the score, the less risk you are to the lender.

Increase Your Credit Score

Sometimes, you can’t help having a low score. You might have lost a job, or you might have had high medical expenses after an accident. Before you buy a house, you should get your score up as high as possible. While it seems like it will drop overnight, it definitely takes some time to increase your credit score. While you are working on your credit score, you can start putting some money aside for a larger down payment. To help increase your credit score:

Get a copy of your credit report and scores from all three major bureaus.

Go through your report. Make note of anything that is incorrect, including accounts you have and your personal information.

Dispute anything that is wrong with each of the credit bureaus. If you have an account that is not yours that is listed on TransUnion, dispute it on TransUnion. If it shows up on TransUnion and Equifax, dispute it on both.

Determine how much revolving credit you have. This is the amount you are allowed to spend on credit cards and some types of home equity loans. Divide the total of your balances by the total amount of credit you have. That number needs to be below 35 percent for a better interest rate. In some cases, a lender will not give you a mortgage if that number is too high.

Showing more credit with a lower debt to credit percentage increases your score. Don’t close out any accounts, but make sure they are all paid on time, and get the highest balances as low as possible. During the months before you buy a house, you should try to avoid using credit cards if possible.

Pay off as much debt as possible.

Remember, every time someone, other than you, pulls your credit, your score gets dinged. Don’t shop for a mortgage until you are ready to buy, and try to keep all inquiries within 30 days.

Keeping good credit is more than paying on time. You also have to responsibly manage your credit.




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